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Silky Chocolate Flaxseed Pudding (Dairy Free & Gluten Free)

Feature, Healthy & Easy Recipes | November 21, 2022

A colourful spread of beautiful salads on flat bread and in glass bowls.
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Chocolate lovers, this one’s for you! This easy flaxseed pudding recipe comes together so quickly – with only 5 minutes of prep time and 1 hour for the pudding to chill. It is one of my fave healthy and easy recipes. Flaxseed pudding is the perfect snack or dessert when you want a little something sweet. Plus, there are SO many other amazing benefits to this recipe:

  • Fibre – Each serving of this flaxseed pudding offers over 6 grams of fibre, which is pretty significant. Women require about 25 grams of fibre per day, while men need closer to 38 grams per day. A snack like this can be a great way to meet those fibre goals! Some other high fibre snacks I love are chickpea jammer cookies and pumpkin chia pudding – perfect for fall!
  • Omega-3 – flaxseeds contain a type of fat called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which is a type of omega-3 that we can get mainly from plant-based food source. These little seeds are an excellent way to boost omega-3 intake, which is important for heart health, brain health, reduction of inflammation, and so much more!
  • Allergen-Friendly – This recipe is free of all major allergens including nuts, dairy, gluten, eggs, and soy. It is also vegan.
A spoon being pulled out of a jar of chocolate flaxseed pudding that is sitting on top of a wooden cutting board. A green and white dish towel is sitting beside it. A text box reads 'silky chocolate flaxseed pudding'

What are the health benefits of flaxseeds?

Flaxseeds are an excellent source of fibre, omega-3, and antioxidants. As a digestive health dietitian, I like to find ways to incorporate important nutrients through food as much as possible. While fibre supplements such as psyllium husk or partially hydrolyzed guar gum can be helpful for bowel issues, I also find flax to be a great fibre booster that can easily be added to recipes.

Whole Flaxseed vs. Ground Flaxseed – what’s the difference?

For this recipe, we are using ground flaxseed, also called flax meal. This type is made when whole flaxseeds are ground into a fine powder. Nutritionally, ground flaxseed is a bit different than whole flaxseed and they each play a different role in digestion. Let’s review:

Digesting whole flaxseed – Due to the tough outer shell of whole flaxseeds, they move through the digestive tract intact. Whole flaxseeds don’t absorb water, therefore they don’t slow down motility and in some cases may even increase intestinal transit time. These are great for those who experience constipation.

Digesting ground flaxseed – Once flaxseed is ground into a powder, there is more soluble fibre that surfaces. This type of fibre is absorptive and works together with water to bulk up stool and improve stool consistency. This can be especially helpful for those who experience looser stools.

How to Use Ground Flaxseed in Other Ways

While I love this pudding recipe, there are many other ways to incorporate ground flaxseed into you diet to help with stool consistency and bulking. Here are some of my favourite options for adding ground flax:

  • As a topper on yogurt – 1 tablespoon mixed into you morning parfait is an awesome way to use flax!
  • Add it to a smoothie – You won’t even notice it’s in there!
  • Mix it into breadcrumbs/panko to make breaded chicken
  • Add it into your morning oatmeal
  • Make energy balls with your favourite nut butter, some oats, ground flax, and dried fruit (dates are my favourite)
  • Use it in your favourite muffin recipes – I love it in this banana tofu muffin recipe!
  • Sprinkle it on anything you can think of! I like to sprinkle it on toast with peanut butter, salads, and even scrambled eggs!

Is flaxseed low FODMAP?

Flaxseed is low FODMAP at a portion of 1 tablespoon. Having 2 tablespoons, however, is not low FODMAP, as this amount is high in galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS). Therefore, this flaxseed pudding recipe is high in GOS, as each serving contains approximately 2.7 tablespoons of flaxseed. If you’re following a low FODMAP diet, I recommend trying a smaller portion and gradually increasing to establish your individual tolerance. None of the other ingredients in this recipe would be considered high FODMAP, just the flaxseed itself.

How to Store Flaxseed Pudding

This pudding can be stored in the fridge for up to 5 days. Try making a batch (or a double batch) on Sunday night for the work week. It’s the perfect grab and go snack. You could also use it as a breakfast – just add your favourite fruit and some protein. A heaping spoonful of greek yogurt or a scoop of protein powder would be a fantastic addition to boost protein in this recipe.

A spoon being pulled out of a jar of chocolate flaxseed pudding that is sitting on top of a wooden cutting board. A green and white dish towel is sitting beside it.
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Silky Chocolate Flaxseed Pudding (Dairy Free & Gluten Free)

Chocolate lovers, this one's for you! This easy flaxseed pudding recipe comes together so quickly – with only 5 minutes of prep time and 1 hour for the pudding to chill. It is high fibre, full of healthy fats, and oh-so-delicious!
Prep Time5 mins
Chill time1 hr
Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: American
Diet: Gluten Free, Low Lactose, Vegan, Vegetarian
Keyword: cold, dairy free, fibre, gluten free, no cook, soluble fibre
Servings: 3

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup ground flaxseed
  • 2 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 cup oat milk or other milk of choice
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup (honey or brown sugar work great too!)
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions

  • In a medium mixing bowl, combine ground flaxseed, cocoa powder, and salt. Mix well.
    grey mixing bowl with ground flax, salt, and cocoa powder sitting on a white countertop beside a green and white dish towel
  • Add 1/2 cup oat milk and begin to mix with the dry ingredients. It will begin to form a thick paste.
    grey mixing bowl with a fork inside it and half-mixed chocolate pudding sitting on a white countertop beside a green and white dish towel
  • Add the remaining 1/2 cup of oat milk, maple syrup, and vanilla extract. Mix well – the consistency will be a thick, pourable liquid.
    grey mixing bowl with chocolate pudding inside sitting on a white countertop beside a green and white dish towel
  • Pour the mixture into 3 containers or jars. Put in the fridge for at least 1 hour before eating.
    Three little jars with green flower on them filled with chocolate pudding sitting on a white countertop
  • When you're ready to enjoy the pudding, add your favourite toppings – I like to add raspberries, dried coconut and slivered almonds!
A spoon being pulled out of a jar of chocolate flaxseed pudding that is sitting on top of a wooden cutting board. A green and white dish towel is sitting beside it. A text box reads 'silky chocolate flaxseed pudding'
Marlee Hamilton
About the Author

Marlee Hamilton

Marlee Hamilton is Ignite's Dietitian Team Lead. She is licensed in both Alberta and Ontario and sees patients virtually. Her specialty is working with patients who have unique and complex health concerns, particularly digestive disorders like IBS, SIBO, and IBD. She has also written an insulin resistance cookbook for PCOS patients and loves empowering people who struggle with this condition. Her realistic and actionable approach helps her patients thrive with small steps toward their big goals.

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